How to Create a Great Personal Elevator Pitch

Imagine this scenario: Heading into an important job interview, you step onto the elevator of the corporate high-rise and, lo and behold, the human resources manager conducting the interview is standing beside you. Instead of maintaining a downward gaze and awkward silence or engaging in menial small talk, you smile confidently, introduce yourself, and launch into your elevator pitch.

Intended for these very types of scenarios, an elevator pitch is a carefully crafted, concise, and compelling speech that serves to sell your business, your product, or yourself by piquing your listener’s interest. Your elevator pitch should be short enough — roughly 150 to 225 words — to be delivered during an elevator ride; between 30 seconds and a minute. It should also be thoroughly rehearsed; know your pitch backward and forward so that when the opportunity presents itself, you can use it to get others excited.

When writing your elevator speech, focus on how to command your listeners’ attention while giving them pertinent information. Here are five steps to crafting a personal elevator pitch that’ll make you a hot commodity this year: Continue reading How to Create a Great Personal Elevator Pitch

Overused Resume Words to Avoid

Want your resume to be different? Avoiding these top 10 most commonly used buzzwords could be a good start. LinkedIn has compiled a list of commonly used terms across all users’ profiles. Here are the results:

What should you use instead of these great terms? Well, synonyms are fine, for example ‘motivated‘ or ‘driven‘ could be replaced by ‘inspired‘.  However, we suggest that instead of simply saying you are ‘passionate’ or ‘strategic’ give a concrete example on your resume proving it.

What problems did your strategy solve? How did you go above the expected because of your passion for the work?

Writing a resume using achievements instead of adjectives will make you stand out more than just switching synonyms. See the original story over at LinkedIn’s Blog:

Brand YOU Year: How to Brand Yourself Without Sounding Like Everyone Else

Infographic: HR Software Outlook for 2015

Let’s take a look at what some HR professionals have revealed about their company’s outlook on software. Results from a survey, conducted by Software Advice, an online resource for HR & recruiting software buyers, shows a glimpse of where HR software is headed.

What we’ve learned:

Most users are generally happy with their software products!

Manual methods, such as spreadsheets are still commonly used, by over two thirds of respondents.

It appears that most companies with under 500 employees are looking to decrease their payroll spending in the next year.

Human resources professionals are slowly adopting mobile technology in their work, with 16% using tablets and 12% using smartphones to access their software. We expect this number to increase over the next year, as more software vendors make their products mobile-friendly and the trend of flexible workplaces continues.

Twitter is better than Facebook for Job Postings

Employers are embracing social media more and more as you work to build an ‘employer brand’. You build company pages hoping to appeal to candidates and as a space to post your job openings.

The most commonly used social networks are LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. Other companies make great use of photo-heavy Pinterest and Instagram.

We regularly get questions for our ATS system about integrating with social media. People want to post their jobs mostly to LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. LinkedIn is by far the best choice for professional networking, this is well understood. However, we’ve found that many employers want equally as much to post their jobs on Facebook.

We feel that Facebook is overrated as a job search tool and employer branding site, while Twitter is more beneficial. Here’s why:

Your company page is only shown to your followers.

Despite posting witty updates and hilarious photos, it’s hard for Facebook pages to gain traction within the network itself. Advertising your Facebook page and asking for likes is something often seen outside the network. It’s only when someone ‘likes’ your company page that they will be shown your company updates and jobs. Job postings are not promoted in any way through Facebook, except to people already connected to your brand.

Now your FB posts will have even less reach

In November 2014, Facebook announced it will be reducing  page posts in the news feed. This was to minimize overly promotional posts to make room for group and friend updates, etc. What this means as a company, is that a post that may have been seen by as much as 16% of followers will only be seen by 5-6%.

Twitter posts can be seen by all users

While a Twitter feed includes people you follow, it is extremely easy to search and save feeds by subject, using hastags. In this way, even non-followers can see posts relevant to them. Simply tag your jobs with the relevant industry or profession. ex: #HRjobs

Unlike Facebook, Twitter is a much more open platform, and does not restrict posts to only followers/friends.

It’s simply much easier to reach a new audience when posts can be searched and found by all users.

 

4 Reasons You Need to Stop Using iFrames

iFrames used to be a common way for ATS systems to display job listings on an employer’s career page. While newer technologies are slowly being introduced, iFrames are still widely used, often simply because of a long term relationship with a vendor who hasn’t updated their product. For a long time, iFrames were an easy solution to integrate a job search and job application within a website.

Unfortunately, this is no longer a good solution, and is very bad practices for a number of reasons: Continue reading 4 Reasons You Need to Stop Using iFrames